Viral Dailies: the end…Before and After (a poem)

My candidate for the last Viral Dailies National Poetry Month 2020 installment.

All Nine

Before and after

There’s this thing going around about
how we should not want to go back
to “normal” because what came before
should be – upon reflection – forsaken.
I don’t know what your normal looked like
before, but as for me, I can’t wait to
have a random unplanned conversation
with a colleague by the coffee machine
as we hover waiting our turn, stand on
the sidelines with the other soccer moms,
go to the Word Barn crowded with lovers
of poetry and listen elbow to elbow
in rapt attention to a local writer
rap about random shit, sip wine as we listen
fully and nod, walk miles back and forth
with the waves and a hundred other
beach walkers on Long Sands, browse
aimlessly in an indie bookshop – touch
every interesting cover, then wait
in the café for my husband, who will take
twice as long to…

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Viral Dailies, Day 3

Kelly Belmonte.jpg

Today, I’m featuring someone who’s become a good friend and favourite contemporary poet, specifically her short form works. Lately, she’s been collaborating with other poets, visual artists, and photographers. In so doing, magic has emerged.

She writes about today’s collaboration: “Tom Darin Liskey was born in Missouri but spent nearly a decade working as a journalist in Venezuela, Argentina and Brazil. He is a graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi. His poetry, fiction and non-fiction have appeared in The Red Truck Review, Deep South, Driftwood Press, Biostories, Spelk, Heartwood among others. His narrative and documentary photography has been published in The Museum of Americana, Change 7, The Blue Mountain Review, Cowboy Jamboree, Literary Life and Midwestern Gothic, among others. He lives in Texas. Connect with him on Instagram at tomdarin.l and https://www.tomdarinphoto.com/.”

I could make a stumbling attempt to recreate the magic here. But, alas, I think it better to simply send you directly to her wonderful poetry blog, All Nine Muses, where that collaboration sings a truer tune.

Happy National Poetry Month!

More NaHaWriMo 2018

More Haiku, or my attempt at the same, for National Haiku Writing Month, 2018!

 

Day 10

Kelly Belmonte,

thanks for the haiku advice.

It’s been most helpful!

 

Day 11

Watch the sky, squinting

against her lonely brilliance –

pants dying winter.

 

Day 12

I never could have

foreseen today unfolding

quite the way it did.

 

Day 13

“It’s only ten bucks,”

he said, through unseeing eyes.

“Why not get a job?”

 

Day 14 (Ash Wednesday)

One swipe of a thumb,

marking our humanity.

Momento mori.

 

Day 15

Let’s shoot our children.

And before their blood is dry,

we’ll do it again.

 

Day 16

Dark and deep the ground

that suffocates our children

and steals our future.

NaHaWriMo, 2018

A friend and fellow poet, Kelly Belmonte, whose blog I follow hungrily, alerted me to the fact that February is National Haiku Writing Month.

I’m not as adept at small form poetry as Kelly and others. Nevertheless, it is the perfect form to perfect form. An excellent poetry muscle-building exercise if ever there was one! So, always up for a challenge (more honestly, something to get me out of writer’s lethargy!), I here submit my pieces for the month so far.

Day 1

Five, seven, and five.

The perfect form for Haiku.

That’s okay by me.

 

Day 2

What if I were dead?

Would my one life have mattered?

What if I’m alive?

 

Day 3

Stuttered in pages –

life inside remembrances,

howls a paper wind.

 

Day 4

Then, I was angry

at ev’rything that rippled

and moved at random.

 

Day 5

I can see rumpled

corners around each morning –

darkness escaping.

 

Day 6

One can flee from death

to find herself, looking back

at what might have been.

 

Day 7

Regret is wasted

on a past, already gone.

There is only now.

 

Day 8

Why do we always

relinquish our sovereignty

over a trifle?

 

Day 9

Who can know the hour

when a dream meets its demise?

Dreams can sleep in hope.